Cardiocerebral Resuscitation – Change brings Fantastic results

Hold on to your brains here people, because I’m about to blow your mind. 

With new research comes new treatment modalities, and with new treatment modalities comes a change in our profession’s very foundation. This change is hard to accept and hard to convince others to implement, but it is necessary for us to do so. 

I’m talking here about CCR, or Cardiocerebral Resuscitation. Hold on, because it’s coming, it’s fantastic, and it will shake the very timbers of our profession.

 First off, if you don’t know what I’m talking about, here are some things you should read first. Go ahead and read them, then come back and read this. I’ll give you a teaser on why you should read forward:

40% – 60% resuscitation rates are possible in witnessed V-Fib cardiac arrests.

 Is that enough incentive for you?

 First, go visit: Http://www.CallandPump.org to read about the ongoing research project.

 Then, read my first post on CCR: Advances in Resuscitation – CCR, if you’re not doing it now, you will be”

Follow the links on that post to see the article outlining the research project and the subsequent article published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

 Did you read them? Good.

 So here are some things you should know about CCR.

 It’s about moving blood – Good compressions make all the difference. Press hard, press fast (100 compressions per minute) and switch out compressors every 1 minute. Yes, do this even though you’re going to complain that I “don’t know how it goes in the field”. Yes, I do because I’m a practicing paramedic with a decade or so of experience and two full-time EMS jobs. I know it’s hard and unwieldy, but the results are almost magical.

 When I first became a CPR instructor for AHA some years ago, I taught my students, incorrectly, that chest compressions were all about compressing the heart between the sternum and the spine. It turns out that I was wrong. The point of effective compressions is to vary total intrathorascic pressure creating both a positive total pressure that forces blood out of every vascular space and organ in the chest including the heart and aorta and also then creating a negative total pressure to pull blood back inside. The more blood you can get flowing, the higher pressure you create in the arteries moving blood through the vascular system and perfusing the heart and the brain. By continuing compressions, you boost the arterial pressure higher to the point where it will perfuse the heart and the brain adequately to maintain some amount of metabolism and prevent some cellular necrosis. When you stop, even for a few seconds, the pressure falls to almost nothing and must be worked back up to the level needed to provide some perfusion of the critical organs. 100 compressions per minute isn’t a request, it’s a mandate if you wish your patient to survive. Switch out compressors every one minute. We’re human beings and we’re fallible. It’s been shown that we cannot maintain adequate compressions for more than a minute. Pop on your ETCo2 monitor and watch the number fall after one person does compressions for longer than that and you’ll believe me.

 Transport is deadly – One of the tenants of CCR is that every intervention that interrupts compressions must be proven to be of more benefit than continued perfusion of the heart and brain. If we are to maintain adequate compressions to continue this perfusion until the heart restarts and begins moving blood on its own, we must not move the patient from a hard, level surface. One of the biggest interruptions of compressions is the act of moving and readying the patient for transport. We jostle them around, put them on a narrow cot, bounce them from wherever they fell, load them into the ambulance, and then bounce them along the road to the ER. All of this decreases arterial pressures by negatively impacting our ability to adequately compress and also by limiting our ability to effectively compress and increase intrathorascic pressures to the extent possible. Therefore, transporting the patient is deadly because it harms our ability to resuscitate our patients.

 Of course I want you to take them to the hospital eventually (hopefully once they’re resuscitated) just don’t be so eager to get them there. Work the patient where you find them. You’ll do your best work on scene and will be pleased with the results.

Be prepared to use more and less common medications – How many medications do you carry on your trucks? One service I work for that doesn’t use the new CCR protocols carries 6 prefilled syringes of Epinephrine 1:10000 on the trucks. Let’s see… One Epi every 3-5minutes x 6 syringes equals 18-30 minutes of epinephrine for the arrests we run. I put the officers on notice that I will be needing a second truck to respond to codes that I attend. In addition, since more patients are being resuscitated, the need to practice post-resuscitative care is increased. Be prepared to hang antiarrythmic drips. Be prepared to hang dopamine. Practice caring for patients post resuscitation. You may want to consider researching induced hypothermia to mitigate reperfusion injury to the heart and brain.

Also, remember that Vasopressin and Amiodarone are in the AHA ACLS protocols. Does your service use them?

Approach cardiac arrest with a clear game plan – If you’re in the emergency services, you should be familiar with the Incident Command System, or ICS. Resuscitations should be no different. One person is the “Code Commander”, one person is the “CPR Sector Officer” and so forth. Train on these like you would train for any other major incident and watch your success rates climb.

I’ll be posting more on this in the coming days. I’m really excited about CCR and the possibilities that it holds for our patients and our profession. You will be too, trust me

  • totwtytr

    The link to your previous post takes us to an interesting article about Haditha, but I don't know if that's where you wanted us to go. Then again, I'm interested in the military railroading being perpetrated so I'll read that one too.

    • sharonchong

      same here

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  • our service trialled this for a few months a while back. randomly selected either full cpr with ventilations, or ccr (although i must admit that i didn't know what it was called!). the only problem was that it was only while control was giving instructions to bystanders. once we turned up it always reverted back to “normal” cpr. but there have definitely been more successful resuses since the rules changed from 15:2 to 30:2, so there's definitely something in it! thanks for the post!!!

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  • emtbernice

    I have had two trainings on this and I can say it is exciting to think that codes will be smoother, more organized (ha!) and more effective for positive outcomes. Granted I am in limbo right now with my EMS career but advances like this that are clear, easy to follow and kick butt in positive statistics is exciting and gives me just a little hope that I do in fact, need to stick around.

    Now that I have made this post about me what I really wanted to say is that CCR is completely daunting at first, but with everything repetition and training make it clear as a bell.

  • emtbernice

    I have had two trainings on this and I can say it is exciting to think that codes will be smoother, more organized (ha!) and more effective for positive outcomes. Granted I am in limbo right now with my EMS career but advances like this that are clear, easy to follow and kick butt in positive statistics is exciting and gives me just a little hope that I do in fact, need to stick around.

    Now that I have made this post about me what I really wanted to say is that CCR is completely daunting at first, but with everything repetition and training make it clear as a bell.

  • emtbernice

    I have had two trainings on this and I can say it is exciting to think that codes will be smoother, more organized (ha!) and more effective for positive outcomes. Granted I am in limbo right now with my EMS career but advances like this that are clear, easy to follow and kick butt in positive statistics is exciting and gives me just a little hope that I do in fact, need to stick around.

    Now that I have made this post about me what I really wanted to say is that CCR is completely daunting at first, but with everything repetition and training make it clear as a bell.

  • Emtd1996

    Sounds like a great theory. I agree with working your pt on scene.. but for our dept., good luck, we are screamed at by chiefs to get going. Hope those useing this find it a success..sounds great.

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