Speeding to the hospital! or.. Nurses: Above the Law

While reading up on EMS blogs today I came across this link over at Burned Out Medic:

http://burnedoutmedic.com/2010/08/there-are-enough-traffic-scofflaws-already/

It links to a story written in a magazine called the “Cath Lab Digest” penned by a “Lead RN” with a bunch of certainly impressive sounding gobbledygook after her name. She writes the story of her outrage and subsequent fight against a traffic ticket she received while responding from home to a cath lab activation at her hospital.

Her story is written in her article, which can be found here: http://www.cathlabdigest.com/articles/My-Day-Court

Here’s the reply that I left her:

I read this and saw the “I’m Special” mentality breaking through all over this piece.

You indicate that by virtue of your job and your training:

- You’re so special your cath lab team cannot handle their job without your leadership, even for up to 12 minutes.

- You’re so special that your objective and destination are more important than the objectives and destination of everyone else on the public roadways.

- You’re so special that the law should not apply to you.

- You’re so special that the other healthcare providers on-duty at the time you are called in cannot possibly be taking care of the patient as well as you can.

- You feel cool being called in and being allowed to drive any way you want.

The officer who stopped and ticketed you disagreed with all of the above. I do as well.

In many states, volunteer fire and emergency medical services personnel are allowed to operate their personal vehicles with emergency lights and sirens when responding to emergency situations. This is because the situations they respond to are extremely time sensitive, requiring professional action within 5 to 10 minutes in some cases in order to mitigate the consequences of the emergency. These calls are usually in the hands of lay persons until the professionals arrive.

Your “emergencies” are time sensitive as well. The AHA recommends a 90 minute window from recognition of STEMI to Cardiac Catheterization. The patient is in the hands of trained people from the time of recognition. There is a huge difference in these standards that does not warrant the risk to the rest of the public for nurses driving in an emergency fashion… especially self-appointed “special” nurses.

I would think that the minutes could be saved in earlier recognition of the STEMI, field activation of the Cath Lab team, earlier notification by the hospital, and perhaps having more qualified people on duty around the clock. This would certainly pay for itself the first time the hospital was liable for you killing someone or being killed yourself while enroute to a page.

I’m sorry if I was perhaps a bit hard on you… but this comment goes out to the rest of the “special” people out there. Obey the law and be safe. Don’t kill me or my family because you believe yourself to be special.

Was I too harsh?

  • http://burnedoutmedic.com Burnedoutmedic

    it’s interesting she doesn’t once mention anything about liability – her liability, the hospital’s liability, and even the liability of someone who mistakenly calls an stemi activation that set the events in motion. only someone who either is naive and/or has never driven emergency vehicles doesn’t stop to consider these things.

  • PJ

    BOM: don’t you know that self-appointed heros are above the law?

    You weren’t harsh enough, frankly.

  • http://portraitofalady-lizzie.blogspot.com/ LadyLizzie

    Not too harsh. It was well written and got to the point without being rude. Sometimes people just need someone else to show them the other point of view.

  • http://twitter.com/firehat firehat

    You were just fine.

  • http://lookingthroughapairofpinkhandledtraumashears.com Medic Trommashere

    Wonderful! I would’ve chewed her out as well!

  • http://burnedoutmedic.com Burnedoutmedic

    how naive of me. in that case, i’m hereby appointing myself “hero” and there are a few people i really don’t like who need to “disappear.”

    =P

  • http://medicandthebeast.blogspot.com/ Orlandomedic1

    I agree with PJ, not harsh enough. I have called these type of people self-important twits for years. They are only important, or “special” in their own minds.

  • lump532

    I don’t see your reply on after her article.

  • http://sixlettervariable.blogspot.com Christopher

    I tried to add some studies to my tongue lashing…because the odds are my disgust won’t sway things, maybe some research will? Right?

  • B. Cans

    And she’s *humble* too!! Not!

    http://www.cathlabdigest.com/article/8817

  • http://davidkonig.com Dave Konig

    Just to play the devil’s advocate, isn’t one of the major complaints from EMS providers that we are called in for non-acute “emergencies”. You know… the inebriated, the recreational narcotic user, the anxiety ridden, and the undomiciled.

    So if we spend all this time responding in an “emergent” mode to non-acute “emergencies” (which actually since a STEMI is already confirmed a cath lab activation is a confirmed emergent case), are we calling out the kettle while we are indeed the pot???

    • http://burnedoutmedic.com Burnedoutmedic

      undomiciled. ha!

      i don’t like going anywhere with lights and sirens, but at least i have a legal exemption, and i am mindful of everything associated with it. she doesn’t and isn’t.

      • http://davidkonig.com Dave Konig

        Being mindful of the powers and repercussions of such an exemption are important, but then why are ambulances constantly colliding with other vehicles or stationary objects? The EMS safety record is far from pristine when it comes to motor vehicle collisions, and is only perhaps overshadowed by the safety record (or lack thereof) held by the medevac section of the industry.

        So while it’s very true that we are granted a legal exemption and she isn’t… really why isn’t she granted the same legal exemption when she has a confirmed emergent case? Or perhaps why are we being granted that legal exemption when we don’t have confirmed emergent cases?

        • http://burnedoutmedic.com Burnedoutmedic

          maybe she should be. or maybe her lab should be staffed to begin with. maybe we should drive to less calls with lights and sirens; i’d have no objection to that. (i’m speaking for myself.) maybe we shouldn’t drive to less calls with lights and sirens because we’re the ones doing the “confirming” these “emergencies” around here.

          i understand that you’re playing devil’s advocate and talking about this in a general way, and i don’t disagree with you. i may drive carefully but plenty of us don’t. but, as it is, she’s not being very convincing as far as i’m concerned.

  • First Due Medic

    Just curious…what was her responce to you? I sent her an email last weekend, only because she included it in her posting, and I basically told her everything you did. Her only reply to me was, “Thank You”

  • ER RN/Medic

    Speeding to the hospital because you are called in for a cath lab patient is stupid, when you wreck, now the hospital has to call in the 2nd call team to replace you. The patient is currently being monitored and treated by the ER staff. Yes one that has worked on the door to balloon team the goal is 60 – 90 minutes, and its great to get the ones under 30 minutes, but not at the risk of injury to self or others. Don’t speed you are not above the law, you know when you are on call and most hospitals require that you be able to respond with in 30 minutes from contact, plan accordingly. Rest assured that the patient is being monitored and treatment has begun by the EMS Crew and ER staff. Most times the Cath Lab team arrives before the Cardiologist and you cant start with out them.

background image Blogger Img

Chris Kaiser aka "Ckemtp"

I am a paramedic trying to advance the idea that the Emergency Medical Services can be made into the profession that we all want it, need it, and know it deserves to be.

JEMS Talk: Google Hangout

Categories
  • 2009 (2)
  • 911 (4)
  • 911 fail (20)
  • accident (4)
  • ACLS (3)
  • Administration & Leadership (85)
  • aed (2)
  • AHA (3)
  • Als (9)
  • ALS Intercept (14)
  • Ambulance (90)
  • Ambulance cleaning (4)
  • Ambulance Driver (6)
  • ambulance humor (20)
  • Ambulance maintenance (4)
  • ambulance report (3)
  • American Heart Association (3)
  • amulance (1)
  • appreciation (13)
  • attack (2)
  • bad calls (5)
  • Bed pan (1)
  • Bed pans (1)
  • bedpan (1)
  • bernoulli (1)
  • blog (5)
  • blogger (4)
  • blogosphere (3)
  • boy scouts (1)
  • camaraderie (2)
  • Case law (2)
  • cat puke (1)
  • cats (1)
  • CCC (5)
  • CCR (7)
  • CDC (1)
  • change (20)
  • chart (1)
  • CISD (3)
  • ckemtp (14)
  • ckemtp rants (29)
  • cnn fail (1)
  • code-3 (2)
  • comfort (1)
  • Command & Leadership (54)
  • cool pics of thunderstorm (1)
  • courtesy (2)
  • cpr (10)
  • cpr fail (4)
  • cpr save (4)
  • crisis (6)
  • dave barry (2)
  • dextrocardia (1)
  • disaster (2)
  • disinfection (4)
  • Dispatch & Communications (2)
  • DNR (5)
  • Do Not Resuscitate Order (5)
  • domestic violence (1)
  • Dr. Bledsoe (1)
  • drive fast (2)
  • duty boots (2)
  • Economics (17)
  • edemse (28)
  • EKG (10)
  • Emergency Communications (5)
  • Emergency Medical Services (189)
  • Emergency Nurse (11)
  • Emergency room (11)
  • Emergency Room Nurse (5)
  • emotions (17)
  • EMS (250)
  • ems 2.0 (67)
  • EMS Blog (19)
  • EMS Blog Carnival (3)
  • EMS blogosphere (11)
  • ems boots (1)
  • EMS Conference (4)
  • EMS Dispatch (3)
  • ems education (54)
  • EMS ethics (54)
  • ems garage (2)
  • EMS Health & Safety (69)
  • EMS Humor (41)
  • EMS Management (52)
  • EMS Motivation (21)
  • EMS motivational posters (1)
  • ems narrative (7)
  • EMS narrative report (6)
  • ems pants (1)
  • EMS paramedics (25)
  • ems patient care report (6)
  • EMS pay sucks (7)
  • ems pcr (1)
  • EMS pep talk (21)
  • EMS practice (8)
  • EMS protocol project (1)
  • EMS protocols (12)
  • EMS rant (27)
  • ems report (3)
  • EMS safety (10)
  • ems salary (8)
  • ems scenario (9)
  • ems scenario based education (12)
  • EMS system (9)
  • EMS Topics (237)
  • EMS training (58)
  • ems uniforms (1)
  • EMS week (10)
  • EMS Week 2009 (2)
  • ems week 2010 (8)
  • EMT (73)
  • emt narrative (3)
  • EMT-Intermediate (6)
  • EMT-Paramedic Specialist (5)
  • ER (8)
  • ET Intubation (3)
  • Ethics (27)
  • everyday ems ethics (29)
  • explosion video (1)
  • extrication (1)
  • ez-io (2)
  • FEMA (2)
  • fire (13)
  • fire boots (2)
  • Fire department (38)
  • fire department taser training (1)
  • Fire Dispatch (1)
  • Fire Prevention & Education (4)
  • Fire Rescue Topics (96)
  • fire truck (1)
  • Firefighter (21)
  • Firefighter Safety & Health (20)
  • firefighter Tazed (1)
  • Firefighting Operations (4)
  • Fires (2)
  • first call (1)
  • first day of school (1)
  • first responder (2)
  • friendly (1)
  • Funding & Staffing (15)
  • funny (8)
  • grumblemedics (6)
  • Happy Medic (2)
  • harry reid (1)
  • HazMat (1)
  • hospital (5)
  • humor (14)
  • hurricane (1)
  • idph (3)
  • illinois (4)
  • In the Line of Duty (13)
  • infection control (5)
  • information (1)
  • inside the mind of a paramedic (16)
  • intraosseous (3)
  • Introduction (1)
  • intubation (3)
  • IO (3)
  • Iowa (4)
  • Iowa EMS (4)
  • ireland (1)
  • Irish EMS (1)
  • IV (3)
  • jaws of life (1)
  • kindergarten (1)
  • kneeling (1)
  • las vegas review journal (1)
  • Letter (2)
  • letter to the editor (4)
  • lights and sirens (2)
  • Line of Duty (12)
  • link (3)
  • MABAS (1)
  • Magnum boots (2)
  • magnum elite equipment (2)
  • mainstream media sucks (3)
  • Major Incidents (3)
  • Management (10)
  • Mass Casualty Incident (1)
  • medical ethics (19)
  • medicblog999 (7)
  • mental illness (2)
  • mental imagery (6)
  • Mission Lifeline (1)
  • Music (1)
  • narrative (4)
  • narrative report (3)
  • new perspective (16)
  • News (23)
  • newspaper (3)
  • NOAA (1)
  • northern illinois (3)
  • nursing home (2)
  • obama (1)
  • odansetron (2)
  • Paramedic (195)
  • paramedic education (74)
  • paramedic narrative (7)
  • paramedic pants (1)
  • paramedic salary (11)
  • Patient Assessment (7)
  • patient care (37)
  • Patient Handovers (3)
  • Patient Management (77)
  • pcr (2)
  • pediatric cardiology (2)
  • physician (10)
  • politics (36)
  • potential (14)
  • PR (5)
  • pride (15)
  • profession (27)
  • professionalism (32)
  • Protocol development (5)
  • psychology (6)
  • Public relations (14)
  • puke (2)
  • rant (7)
  • relationships (2)
  • renaisance (1)
  • rescue (1)
  • rescuing providence (1)
  • RN (3)
  • Rockford (1)
  • roll-over (1)
  • run sheet (2)
  • rural ems (3)
  • sadness (6)
  • safety (4)
  • salary (7)
  • sanitize (3)
  • save (3)
  • scenario (13)
  • scenario based training (15)
  • school bus (1)
  • Scope of Practice (4)
  • severe storm pictures (2)
  • sherman frederick (1)
  • shift length (2)
  • show tunes (1)
  • SitRep (1)
  • Skilled Nursing Facility (2)
  • SMG (7)
  • SMO (7)
  • soap (4)
  • soap charting (3)
  • socialized medicine (4)
  • southern wisconsin (4)
  • Special Operations (1)
  • STEMI (8)
  • stories (11)
  • swine flu (2)
  • Taser (1)
  • tattoo (1)
  • tattoo humor (1)
  • Technology & Communications (9)
  • technology-communications-ems-topics (10)
  • thank you (3)
  • The EMT Spot (2)
  • The Handover (3)
  • The Shine Factor (2)
  • thom dick (1)
  • thunderstorm (1)
  • train derailment (1)
  • train explosion (1)
  • Training (16)
  • Training & Development (49)
  • training-fire-rescue-topics (19)
  • Transfer of Care (1)
  • UK Child custody (1)
  • UK medic attacked (1)
  • UK paramedics (5)
  • Uncategorized (230)
  • united kingdom (4)
  • universal healthcare (5)
  • us (2)
  • US economy (11)
  • Vehicle Operation & Ambulances (3)
  • Vehicle Operations & Apparatus (1)
  • Videos (3)
  • volunteer fire department (9)
  • volunteer firefighter (6)
  • wall cloud (1)
  • Week (1)
  • whattaya do (4)
  • when god made paramedics (1)
  • wisconsin (3)
  • wolf parkinson white (1)
  • wpw (1)
  • wpw syndrome (1)
  • Your Happy Medic (5)
  • zofran (1)
  • Comments
    Ianto Jones
    The Natural Alignment Movement – Freedom of Choice from the Orthopedic Conspiracy
    Oh, dear G-d. This was hilarious, but I'm fighting not to find it dangerous as well -- someone's gonna share it on FB, and one of _their_ friends is going to send it to Bright Star MorningGlory Rainbow, who will send it to her YahooGroup, and someone there will reply that he *thinks* he broke…
    2014-11-18 09:54:00
    Thad Torix
    Patient Friendly Jokes
    Have you heard my construction joke? I'm still working on it.... (Credit to my youngest daughter for that one. My partners are absolutely sick of hearing that joke...) On another note, what a fantastic blog. If you are ever in SW Missouri, stop by and say hello. Thad Torix - EMS Instructor & Clinical Coordinator…
    2014-11-03 18:27:00
    mr618
    Welcome to the Club
    Well said, Chris. We can't save everybody, but the ones we don't save tend to stick around a lot longer than the ones we do save.
    2014-10-18 14:40:00
    Steel City Medic
    Welcome to the Club
    Particularly appropriate for me this week. Thanks.
    2014-09-23 21:46:00
    DiverMedic
    Welcome to the Club
    Very well done, Chris.
    2014-09-17 22:15:00

    Care to Search the Blog?

    FireEMS Blogs eNewsletter

    Sign-up to receive our free monthly eNewsletter

    LATEST EMS NEWS

    HOT FORUM DISCUSSIONS