EMS Week 2011 – WANTYNU

We’re going to do a little thought exercise here, Folks.

If you’re in a place where you’re around people, pick out five people at random. If not, think of five friends or family members. Look at their faces and get a good mental picture of them as the people you know or can assume them to be. Take a minute or two, I’ll wait.

Now assign one of the following emergency medical conditions to them. One of them should have a seizure, one of them should have a stroke, one should have a heart attack, one should get into a car accident, and one should stop breathing. Remember, this is a thought exercise, so don’t actually do anything to harm anyone. Just imagine that these things have happened to the people you know and care about. Pretend they happen to them right in front of you.

Really, do it.

Scary, isn’t it? It’s terrifying really, if you stop to think about it. I can imagine you’re thinking that this is overly dramatic and maybe even a little silly. Perhaps you’re wondering why I would ask you to think about terrible things happening to people that you know and or love. Why would I make you do such a thing? It’s awful, isn’t it?

Yeah, it is. Just trust me on this; it’s necessary for this one.

Now think of exactly what you would do in each and every one of the above situations. Think of the very next people you would want to see. Chances are you know exactly what you would do and who you would want to see. You’d call 911 and hope that the ambulance would show up to take care of the situation. You’d pray that they got their quickly and then you’d pray that they knew what they were doing and were good at doing it. You’d pray for your loved one and you’d be scared. You’d want them to get better and you’d want the people in the ambulance that came to help them to make them get better. I can guarantee that this would be an intense experience that you would remember clearly for a very long time.  It would probably be a life-changing event for you… and maybe for them as well.

As a paramedic, I cover a 911 response territory that contains anywhere between 20,000 to 30,000 souls. It’s not the biggest jurisdiction out there, nor is it the smallest, but it generates enough calls to keep me busy. My service responds to around 3000 requests for ambulance service every year and the number keeps rising. Every one of these calls for help come from people that somebody, somewhere cares about. Every one of these people is a friend and family member to someone in and around our community and every one of them are important. Every one of these people instinctively knows exactly who they will call and come to depend upon when the unthinkable happens to their loved ones or to someone around them. They’ll call me or one of my coworkers and just like you in the thought exercise above, they’ll pray that the same things happen for them. They’ll want us to come right away, they’ll want us to be exceptionally good at what we do, and they’ll want us to make them or the person they called for be better. They’ll want our service right then and there and they’ll demand these things of us at that time. They’ll think nothing of the system that’s in place to come to help them, they’ll just demand that it be there and that it be excellent.The EMT Oath as adopted by the NAMET

Luckily for the people in my jurisdiction, I work with some exceptional individuals. I take pride in the Paramedics and Emergency Medical Technicians who I work with at my ambulance service. I know that each and every one of them is a competent, caring professional who is very much up to the task of caring for our community. I know that they all take their high level of responsibility very seriously and I know that every time they roll out they will do a fantastic job. I know their strengths and their weaknesses. I know how they’ll react to most situations and I know the tools they’ll use to do it. I know the system intimately, its strengths and weaknesses and where it could use improvement. I know where we need to strengthen our service level and where we could stand to apply more resources. I know this because I’m involved in the system, and also because I care about it. I do my part both as a citizen and as an EMS professional to ensure that my community’s EMS system is in-shape and second to none.

I care about EMS before I need it.

Today is Wednesday, May 18, 2011 and we’re smack-dab in the middle of EMS week 2011. EMS Week is a week where EMS people are generally ignored a little less than we usually are during the other 51 weeks of the year. Sometimes we get little trinkets from our employers and sometimes we get free food from the hospitals we transport patients to. It’s nice. Unfortunately, it’s mostly EMS people who celebrate it, and we generally do a poor job of getting the word out.

There’s a product I use called the WANTYNU oxygen wrench that an EMS person designs and sells, and no, this isn’t a paid ad for the product. However, I have always loved the name. It’s an acronym that stands for “We Ain’t Nothing Till You Need Us” which is unfortunately is how a lot of EMS people think the public sees them. I’ll admit that there are days where I feel the same way. I try to remain positive about our public image but I see examples of the public not knowing, nor caring about what we do until the moment they need us. I can only imagine what we could accomplish if the public would care about their EMS service all 52 weeks of the year. Maybe all of our problems would disappear if the public cared about how much they supported us. Maybe we could finally give them the true level of service they deserve if we had the resources to give it.

Maybe so.

_______________________________

Happy EMS Week. For some things that I’ve written in past years, check out the links below.

http://lifeunderthelights.com/2010/09/1242/ – What difference does EMS make?

http://lifeunderthelights.com/2010/05/ems-week-2010-all-respect-is-earned/ – Earning Respect

http://lifeunderthelights.com/2010/05/ems-week-2010-sent-to-the-newspaper/ – A letter to the editor that you can send to your local paper.

  • Josh @ Wantynu

    Great exercise!

    A heart felt wish of acknowledgment that we DO exist and we stand up when called to act, without fanfare, without the need for glory, but simply to aid a fellow human being in need. WANTYNU the acronym was born from my partner and I trying to address these very feelings, and even though it struck a cord of truth in us, we always know we are so much more.

    Nicely written.

    Josh
    NREMT-P
    Wantynu

  • M LaSala

    Josh-
    You should move to Wilton, CT. We love our EMS and they are a highly respected and regarded group. And if you need me to find you ahouse…give me a call!!
    Marianne

  • http://burnedoutmedic.com Burnedoutmedic

    just another thankless job, expected to do all kinds of dirty work.

  • Josh @ Wantynu

    Hi Marianne! Long time, great to hear from you, but I gotta know; what are you doing on a EMS blog my dear? ;-)

    PS. NYC loves its EMS too, but it’s a tough job no matter what part of the country your in, even Wilton. (I do love the town though).

  • Amy Sellers

    I’m a bit behind in my RSS feed, so I know I’m belated, but happy EMS week. Thanks for all the great posts :)

  • Too Old To Work

    Ah, yeah. The fact is that most people don’t want to think about EMS, until they need us that is. Then what they mostly want is for us to take them to the hospital. In some cases, transport is ALL that they want. Part of the job is explaining to them that there are things that we need to do for the patient before we transport.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Angela-Kelley/1043906171 Angela Kelley

    I really enjoyed this exercise. . I hope that I never have to come a across a situation like this, But I hope I can step out of the box from being mom, friend , sister, daughter. . To do wat I am trained for and what I love to do!!

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Chris Kaiser aka "Ckemtp"

I am a paramedic trying to advance the idea that the Emergency Medical Services can be made into the profession that we all want it, need it, and know it deserves to be.

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  • Comments
    Ckemtp
    I Got Attacked – A Paramedic Speaks About Public Trust
    I somewhat agree, though I assure you I didn't set out to waste your time. I probably should have broken this down into two separate points as the second point was the one I most wanted to emphasize. My bad on this one, I'll do better next time. Thanks for the feedback. If you'd like,…
    2014-12-16 20:25:00
    hawk4080
    I Got Attacked – A Paramedic Speaks About Public Trust
    Wow. That was a total waste to read.
    2014-12-16 19:20:00
    retired ems medic
    I Got Attacked – A Paramedic Speaks About Public Trust
    The radios should have had a trouble button to eliminate the need to key the Mike and talk. Maybe the dispatchers need to be rotated out to the streets to get out of the mode of just getting the calls out and only half listening to the radio.
    2014-12-16 14:50:00
    HybridMedic
    I Got Attacked – A Paramedic Speaks About Public Trust
    We use "Signal C" as a code to relay a crew in distress. Takes a second for the dispatchers to confirm it, but it sends the nearest engine, battalion chief, fire investigator (who are sworn LEO's) and makes an officer in distress call to Memphis Police. The arrival of all those resources is quite... Dramatic.
    2014-12-15 14:29:00
    exmedic
    Welcome to the Club
    Not me anymore
    2014-12-15 09:17:00

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